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Viruses 2015, 7(9), 5145-5154; doi:10.3390/v7092865

Tight Junctions Go Viral!

Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 2001, Colonia Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210, Mexico
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexander Ploss
Received: 18 June 2015 / Accepted: 15 September 2015 / Published: 23 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Viruses)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [733 KB, uploaded 23 September 2015]   |  

Abstract

Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: tight junctions; virus; JAM-A; occludin; claudins; ZO-1; PDZ tight junctions; virus; JAM-A; occludin; claudins; ZO-1; PDZ
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Torres-Flores, J.M.; Arias, C.F. Tight Junctions Go Viral! Viruses 2015, 7, 5145-5154.

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