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Forests 2017, 8(6), 194; doi:10.3390/f8060194

Preserving Ecosystem Services on Indigenous Territory through Restoration and Management of a Cultural Keystone Species

1
Chaire de recherche du Canada en foresterie autochtone, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boulevard de l'Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
2
Chaire Industrielle CRSNG-UQAT-UQÀM en aménagement forestier durable, Institut de recherche sur les forêts, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boulevard de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
Current address: Research Centre for Applied Science and Technology (RECAST), Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ir. Kris verheyen
Received: 10 April 2017 / Revised: 28 May 2017 / Accepted: 29 May 2017 / Published: 3 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management Strategies for Forest Ecosystem Services)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3552 KB, uploaded 3 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) is a cultural keystone tree species in the forests of eastern North America, providing numerous ecosystem services to Indigenous people. White pine abundance in the landscape has considerably decreased over the last few centuries due to overharvesting, suppression of surface fires, extensive management, and plantation failure. The Kitcisakik Algonquin community of western Quebec is calling for restoration and sustainable management of white pine on its ancestral territory, to ensure provision of associated ecosystem services. We present five white pine restoration and management scenarios taking into account community needs and ecological types: (1) natural regeneration of scattered white pines to produce individuals of different sizes and ages used as medicinal plants; (2) protection of supercanopy white pines used as landmarks and for providing habitat for flagship wildlife species, and younger individuals left as regeneration and future canopy trees; (3) the uniform shelterwood system to create white pine-dominated stands that provide habitat for flagship wildlife species and support cultural activities; (4) under-canopy plantations to yield mature white pine stands for timber production; (5) mixed plantations to produce forests with aesthetic qualities that provide wildlife habitat and protect biodiversity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal people; ecological restoration; ecosystem services; Pinus strobus L.; shelterwood; sustainable forest management; traditional ecological knowledge; white pine Aboriginal people; ecological restoration; ecosystem services; Pinus strobus L.; shelterwood; sustainable forest management; traditional ecological knowledge; white pine
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Uprety, Y.; Asselin, H.; Bergeron, Y. Preserving Ecosystem Services on Indigenous Territory through Restoration and Management of a Cultural Keystone Species. Forests 2017, 8, 194.

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