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Forests 2017, 8(11), 450; doi:10.3390/f8110450

Responses of Contrasting Tree Functional Types to Air Warming and Drought

1
Ecoclimatology, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany
2
Departamento de Silvicultura y Gestión de los Sistemas Forestales, CIFOR-INIA, Carretera de la Coruña Km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstraße 2a, 85748 Garching, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 September 2017 / Revised: 8 November 2017 / Accepted: 14 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
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Abstract

Climate change-induced rise of air temperatures and the increase of extreme climatic events, such as droughts, will largely affect plant growth and hydraulics, leading to mortality events all over the globe. In this study, we investigated the growth and hydraulic responses of seedlings of contrasting functional types. Pinus sylvestris, Quercus spp. and Castanea sativa seedlings were grown in a common garden experiment under four treatments: control, air warming, drought and their combination during two consecutive growing periods. Height and diameter increments, stomatal conductance and stem water potentials were measured during both growing seasons. Additionally, hydraulic parameters such as xylem-specific native and maximum hydraulic conductivities, and native percentage of loss of conductivity were measured at the end of the entire experiment. Our results clearly pointed to different adaptive strategies of the studied species. Scots pine displayed a relatively isohydric behavior with a strict stomata control prohibiting native embolism whereas sweet chestnut and oak as relatively anisohydric species displayed an increased loss of native conductivity as a results of low water potentials. Seasonal timing of shoot and diameter growth also differed among functional types influencing drought impacts. Additionally, the possibility of embolism reversal seemed to be limited under the study conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; drought; hydraulic conductivity; stem water potential; manipulation experiment; plant functional types; tree growth; stomatal conductance; warming climate change; drought; hydraulic conductivity; stem water potential; manipulation experiment; plant functional types; tree growth; stomatal conductance; warming
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Martínez-Sancho, E.; Vásconez Navas, L.K.; Seidel, H.; Dorado-Liñán, I.; Menzel, A. Responses of Contrasting Tree Functional Types to Air Warming and Drought. Forests 2017, 8, 450.

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