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Forests 2016, 7(10), 243; doi:10.3390/f7100243

Can Retention Harvest Maintain Natural Structural Complexity? A Comparison of Post-Harvest and Post-Fire Residual Patches in Boreal Forest

1
Forest Research Institute, NSERC-UQAT-UQAM Industrial Chair in Sustainable Forest Management, Université du Québec en Abitibi Témiscamingue, 445, boul. de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
2
NSERC-UQAT-UQAM Industrial Chair in Sustainable Forest Management, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Case postale 8888, Succursale Centre-ville Montréal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Brian J. Palik
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 30 September 2016 / Accepted: 5 October 2016 / Published: 21 October 2016
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Abstract

Variable retention harvest promotes biodiversity conservation in managed boreal forests by ensuring forest continuity and structural complexity. However, do post-harvest and post-fire patches maintain the same structural complexity? This study compares post-harvest and post-fire residual patches and proposes retention modalities that can maintain the same structural complexity as in natural forests, here considering both continuous forest stands and post-fire residual patches. In boreal black spruce forests, 41 post-fire residual patches, and 45 post-harvest retention patches of varying size and ages (exposure time to disturbed matrix) and 37 continuous forest stands were classified into six diameter structure types. Types 1 (inverted-J) and 2 (trunked-unimodal) characterized stands dominated by small trees. The abundance of small trees decreased and the abundance of large trees increased from Type 1 to Type 6. Type 6 had the most irregular structure with a wide range of diameters. This study indicates that: (1) old post-harvest residual retentions maintained the range of structural complexity found in natural stands; (2) Types 1 and 2 were generally associated with young post-fire patches and post-harvest retention clumps; (3) the structure of residual patches containing only small trees was usually younger (in terms of the age of the original forest from which residual patches were formed) than those with larger trees. To avoid the risk of simplifying the structure, retention patches should be intentionally oriented towards Types 3–6, dominated by intermediate and large trees. View Full-Text
Keywords: diameter structure; structural attributes; ecosystem based management; disturbance; black spruce-feathermoss forest; continuous forest diameter structure; structural attributes; ecosystem based management; disturbance; black spruce-feathermoss forest; continuous forest
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Moussaoui, L.; Fenton, N.J.; Leduc, A.; Bergeron, Y. Can Retention Harvest Maintain Natural Structural Complexity? A Comparison of Post-Harvest and Post-Fire Residual Patches in Boreal Forest. Forests 2016, 7, 243.

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