Next Article in Journal
Dendrochronological Potential in a Semi-Deciduous Rainforest: The Case of Pericopsis elata in Central Africa
Next Article in Special Issue
Predicted Changes in Climatic Niche and Climate Refugia of Conservation Priority Salamander Species in the Northeastern United States
Previous Article in Journal
A Stand-Class Growth and Yield Model for Mexico’s Northern Temperate, Mixed and Multiaged Forests
Previous Article in Special Issue
Slow Lives in the Fast Landscape: Conservation and Management of Plethodontid Salamanders in Production Forests of the United States
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2014, 5(12), 3070-3086; doi:10.3390/f5123070

The Importance of Maintaining Upland Forest Habitat Surrounding Salamander Breeding Ponds: Case Study of the Eastern Tiger Salamander in New York, USA

1
Department of Natural Resources, Green Mountain College, One Brennan Circle, Poultney, VT 05764, USA
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, P.O. Box 6000 Binghamton, NY 13902, USA
3
Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 October 2014 / Revised: 2 December 2014 / Accepted: 2 December 2014 / Published: 9 December 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [692 KB, uploaded 9 December 2014]   |  

Abstract

Most amphibians use both wetland and upland habitats, but the extent of their movement in forested habitats is poorly known. We used radiotelemetry to observe the movements of adult and juvenile eastern tiger salamanders over a 4-year period. Females tended to move farther from the breeding ponds into upland forested habitat than males, while the distance a juvenile moved appeared to be related to body size, with the largest individuals moving as far as the adult females. Individuals chose refugia in native pitch pine—oak forested habitat and avoided open fields, roads, and developed areas. We also observed a difference in potential predation pressures in relation to the distance an individual moved from the edge of the pond. Our results support delineating forested wetland buffer zones on a case-by-case basis to reduce the impacts of concentrated predation, to increase and protect the availability of pitch pine—oak forests near the breeding pond, and to focus primarily on the habitat needs of the adult females and larger juveniles, which in turn will encompass habitat needs of adult males and smaller juveniles. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ambystoma tigrinum; tiger salamander; amphibians; radiotelemetry; buffer zone; conservation management; forested habitat Ambystoma tigrinum; tiger salamander; amphibians; radiotelemetry; buffer zone; conservation management; forested habitat
Figures

Figure 1a

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Titus, V.; Madison, D.; Green, T. The Importance of Maintaining Upland Forest Habitat Surrounding Salamander Breeding Ponds: Case Study of the Eastern Tiger Salamander in New York, USA. Forests 2014, 5, 3070-3086.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top