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Forests 2014, 5(12), 2996-3021; doi:10.3390/f5122996

From Co-Management to Landscape Governance: Whither Ghana’s Modified Taungya System?

1
Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 15629, 1001 NC Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Forest Science, School of Natural Resources, The University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), P.O. Box 214, Sunyani, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana
3
Faculty of Renewable Natural Resources (FRNR), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ashanti Region, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 October 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 27 November 2014 / Published: 4 December 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Governing Forest Landscapes: Challenges and Ways Forward)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [352 KB, uploaded 4 December 2014]   |  

Abstract

Natural resource management literature has documented three paradigm shifts over the past decade: from co-management to adaptive co-management and adaptive governance respectively and, more recently, towards landscape governance. The latter is conceived as a governance approach towards negotiated land use at the landscape level to deal with global challenges such as food insecurity, climate change and biodiversity loss. There is not a lot of clarity about how co-management systems could actually evolve into landscape governance. This paper aims to address the gap by exploring how a stalled co-management system for the reforestation of degraded forest areas—the modified taungya system (MTS) in Ghana—could be revitalised and redesigned as a landscape approach. Drawing on case studies and expert consultation, the performance of the national MTS and the MTS under the Community Forestry Management Project is reviewed with regard to five principles (integrated approach, multi-stakeholder negotiation, polycentric governance, continual learning and adaptive capacity) and three enabling conditions (social capital, bridging organisations and long-term funding) distilled from the literature. The authors conclude that some of these principles and conditions were met under the Community Forestry Management Project, but that continual learning, transcending jurisdictional boundaries, developing adaptive capacity, and long-term funding and benefits still pose challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: adaptive co-management; adaptive governance; landscape governance; landscape approach; social capital; bridging organisations; reforestation; modified taungya system; Ghana adaptive co-management; adaptive governance; landscape governance; landscape approach; social capital; bridging organisations; reforestation; modified taungya system; Ghana
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ros-Tonen, M.A.F.; Derkyi, M.; Insaidoo, T.F.G. From Co-Management to Landscape Governance: Whither Ghana’s Modified Taungya System? Forests 2014, 5, 2996-3021.

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