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Comment published on 22 April 2014, see Forests 2014, 5(4), 822-826.

Open AccessReview
Forests 2014, 5(1), 103-133; doi:10.3390/f5010103

Management for Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak Suppression: Does Relevant Science Support Current Policy?

1
Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59804, USA
2
School of Law, University of California, Berkeley, CA 97420-7200, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 December 2013 / Revised: 27 December 2013 / Accepted: 6 January 2014 / Published: 15 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Bark Beetles and Forests)
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Abstract

While the use of timber harvests is generally accepted as an effective approach to controlling bark beetles during outbreaks, in reality there has been a dearth of monitoring to assess outcomes, and failures are often not reported. Additionally, few studies have focused on how these treatments affect forest structure and function over the long term, or our forests’ ability to adapt to climate change. Despite this, there is a widespread belief in the policy arena that timber harvesting is an effective and necessary tool to address beetle infestations. That belief has led to numerous proposals for, and enactment of, significant changes in federal environmental laws to encourage more timber harvests for beetle control. In this review, we use mountain pine beetle as an exemplar to critically evaluate the state of science behind the use of timber harvest treatments for bark beetle suppression during outbreaks. It is our hope that this review will stimulate research to fill important gaps and to help guide the development of policy and management firmly based in science, and thus, more likely to aid in forest conservation, reduce financial waste, and bolster public trust in public agency decision-making and practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: bark beetle; clearcut; climate change; climate change adaptation; daylighting; Dendroctonus ponderosae; forest pest management; monitoring; sanitation; thinning bark beetle; clearcut; climate change; climate change adaptation; daylighting; Dendroctonus ponderosae; forest pest management; monitoring; sanitation; thinning
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Six, D.L.; Biber, E.; Long, E. Management for Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak Suppression: Does Relevant Science Support Current Policy? Forests 2014, 5, 103-133.

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