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Materials 2014, 7(8), 5520-5527; doi:10.3390/ma7085520

Transverse Anderson Localization in Disordered Glass Optical Fibers: A Review

1
Center for High Technology Materials and the Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
2
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
3
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla,CA 92093, USA
4
Optical Physics and Networks Technology, Corning Incorporated, SP-AR-01-2, Sullivan Park,Corning, NY 14831, USA
5
Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET) and the Departmentof Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29625, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 17 July 2014 / Published: 28 July 2014
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Abstract

Disordered optical fibers show novel waveguiding properties that can be used for various device applications, such as beam-multiplexed optical communications and endoscopic image transport. The strong transverse scattering from the transversely disordered optical fibers results in transversely confined beams that can freely propagate in the longitudinal direction, similar to conventional optical fibers, with the advantage that any point in the cross section of the fiber can be used for beam transport. For beam multiplexing and imaging applications, it is highly desirable to make the localized beam radius as small as possible. This requires large refractive index differences between the materials that define the random features in the disordered fiber. Here, disordered glass-air fibers are briefly reviewed, where randomly placed airholes in a glass matrix provide the sufficiently large refractive index difference of 0.5 for strong random transverse scattering. The main future challenge for the fabrication of an optimally disordered glass-air fibers is to increase the fill-fraction of airholes to nearly 50% for maximum beam confinement. View Full-Text
Keywords: Anderson localization; optical fiber; random optical fiber; disordered optical fiber; nanostructured optical fiber; microstructured optical fiber; glass optical fiber; imaging fiber Anderson localization; optical fiber; random optical fiber; disordered optical fiber; nanostructured optical fiber; microstructured optical fiber; glass optical fiber; imaging fiber
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mafi, A.; Karbasi, S.; Koch, K.W.; Hawkins, T.; Ballato, J. Transverse Anderson Localization in Disordered Glass Optical Fibers: A Review. Materials 2014, 7, 5520-5527.

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