Next Article in Journal
The Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical and Wear Properties of AZ31 Alloy
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of Anisotropy on the Resilient Behaviour of a Granular Material in Low Traffic Pavement
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Materials 2017, 10(12), 1383; doi:10.3390/ma10121383

Co-Precipitation, Strength and Electrical Resistivity of Cu–26 wt % Ag–0.1 wt % Fe Alloy

1,2
,
1,3,* and 1,3,*
1
Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, China
2
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004, China
3
School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 3 December 2017 / Accepted: 1 December 2017 / Published: 3 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Manufacturing Processes and Systems)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2874 KB, uploaded 15 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Both a Cu–26 wt % Ag (Fe-free) alloy and Cu–26 wt % Ag–0.1 wt % Fe (Fe-doping) alloy were subjected to different heat treatments. We studied the precipitation kinetics of Ag and Cu, microstructure evolution, magnetization, hardness, strength, and electrical resistivity of the two alloys. Fe addition was incapable of changing the precipitation kinetics of Ag and Cu; however, it decreased the size and spacing of rod-shaped Ag precipitates within a Cu matrix, because Fe might affect the elastic strain field and diffusion field, suppressing the nucleation of Ag precipitates. Magnetization curves showed that γ-Fe precipitates were precipitated out of the Cu matrix, along with Ag precipitates in Fe-doping alloy after heat treatments. The yield strength of the Fe-doping alloy was higher than that of the Fe-free alloy, and the maximum increment was about 41.3%. The electrical conductivity in the aged Fe-doping alloy was up to about 67% IACS (International Annealed Copper Standard). Hardness, strength, and electrical resistivity were intensively discussed, based on the microstructural characterization and solute contributions of both alloys. Our results demonstrated that an increasing fraction of nanoscale γ-Fe precipitates and decreasing spacing between Ag precipitates resulted in the increasing strength of the Fe-doping alloy. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cu–Ag alloy; Fe addition; co-precipitation; precipitation kinetics; hardness; electrical resistivity Cu–Ag alloy; Fe addition; co-precipitation; precipitation kinetics; hardness; electrical resistivity
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Li, R.; Wang, E.; Zuo, X. Co-Precipitation, Strength and Electrical Resistivity of Cu–26 wt % Ag–0.1 wt % Fe Alloy. Materials 2017, 10, 1383.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Materials EISSN 1996-1944 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top