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Energies 2016, 9(7), 482; doi:10.3390/en9070482

The Regulatory Noose: Logan City’s Adventures in Micro-Hydropower

Department of Economics and Finance, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
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Academic Editors: Maurizio Sasso and Carlo Roselli
Received: 4 March 2016 / Revised: 4 June 2016 / Accepted: 17 June 2016 / Published: 23 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy Technologies for Small Scale Applications)
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Abstract

Recent growth in the renewable energy industry has increased government support for alternative energy. In the United States, hydropower is the largest source of renewable energy and also one of the most efficient. Currently, there are 30,000 megawatts of potential energy capacity through small- and micro-hydro projects throughout the United States. Increased development of micro-hydro could double America’s hydropower energy generation, but micro-hydro is not being developed at the same rate as other renewable sources. Micro-hydro is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and subject to the same regulation as large hydroelectric projects despite its minimal environmental impact. We studied two cases of micro-hydro projects in Logan, Utah, and Afton, Wyoming, which are both small rural communities. Both cases showed that the web of federal regulation is likely discouraging the development of micro-hydro in the United States by increasing the costs in time and funds for developers. Federal environmental regulation like the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and others are likely discouraging the development of clean renewable energy through micro-hydro technology. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydropower; regulation; renewable energy; micro-hydropower hydropower; regulation; renewable energy; micro-hydropower
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Hansen, M.; Simmons, R.T.; Yonk, R.M. The Regulatory Noose: Logan City’s Adventures in Micro-Hydropower. Energies 2016, 9, 482.

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