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Energies 2016, 9(3), 136; doi:10.3390/en9030136

Closed Solar House with Radiation Filtering Roof for Transplant Production in Arid Regions: Energy Consumption

1
Department of Agricultural Engineering, College of Food and Agriculture Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
2
Department of Plant Production, College of Food and Agriculture Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Timothy Anderson
Received: 14 November 2015 / Revised: 10 December 2015 / Accepted: 16 February 2016 / Published: 26 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Heating & Cooling)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6202 KB, uploaded 26 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Under harsh weather conditions, closed transplant production systems (CTPS) are currently used to produce high quality transplants under artificial lighting. More than 70% of the electric energy consumed in the CTPS is for lighting. This article presents a simulation study to examine the possibility of using an alternative closed solar house, with radiation filtering roof, for transplant production in hot sunny regions to replace the artificial lighting in the CTPS with sunlight. The sidewalls of the house were insulated as in the CTPS and the roof was transparent, and made from polycarbonate hollow-channeled structure. There was a liquid radiation filter (LRF) (1.5% CuSO4–water solution) flowing in a closed loop through the roof channels to absorb the solar heat load (i.e., the near infra-red radiation, NIR: 700–2500 nm) and transmit the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR: 400–700 nm) for plant growth. The LRF inlet temperature was assumed to be 25 °C to prevent vapor condensation on the inner surface of the cover. The evapo-transpired water vapor was removed immediately to maintain the relative humidity inside the house at 70%. The results proved that this technique can offer an appropriate air temperature inside the house less than outside air temperature by around 8–10 °C in hot summer days, and the integrated electric energy consumption during the production period was estimated to be around 43% of the CTPS consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: fluid-roof; hot desert; solar radiation; transplants production; radiation filter fluid-roof; hot desert; solar radiation; transplants production; radiation filter
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Abdel-Ghany, A.M.; Al-Helal, I.M.; Alsadon, A.A.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Shady, M.R. Closed Solar House with Radiation Filtering Roof for Transplant Production in Arid Regions: Energy Consumption. Energies 2016, 9, 136.

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