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Energies 2015, 8(12), 14380-14406; doi:10.3390/en81212432

Integrated Assessment of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in South Africa’s Power Sector

Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, Döppersberg 19, Wuppertal 42103, Germany
Current address: German Federal Environment Agency, Bismarckplatz 1, Berlin 14193, Germany
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Received: 17 October 2015 / Revised: 29 November 2015 / Accepted: 7 December 2015 / Published: 18 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Energy and Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

This article presents an integrated assessment conducted in order to explore whether carbon capture and storage (CCS) could be a viable technological option for significantly reducing future CO2 emissions in South Africa. The methodological approach covers a commercial availability analysis, an analysis of the long-term usable CO2 storage potential (based on storage capacity assessment, energy scenario analysis and source-sink matching), an economic and ecological assessment and a stakeholder analysis. The findings show, that a reliable storage capacity assessment is needed, since only rough figures concerning the effective capacity currently exist. Further constraints on the fast deployment of CCS may be the delayed commercial availability of CCS, significant barriers to increasing the economic viability of CCS, an expected net maximum reduction rate of the power plant’s greenhouse gas emissions of 67%–72%, an increase in other environmental and social impacts, and low public awareness of CCS. One precondition for opting for CCS would be to find robust solutions to these constraints, taking into account that CCS could potentially conflict with other important policy objectives, such as affordable electricity rates to give the whole population access to electricity. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon capture and storage (CCS); South Africa; integrated assessment; power sector; CO2 storage potential; competing policy targets; emerging economies carbon capture and storage (CCS); South Africa; integrated assessment; power sector; CO2 storage potential; competing policy targets; emerging economies
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Viebahn, P.; Vallentin, D.; Höller, S. Integrated Assessment of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in South Africa’s Power Sector. Energies 2015, 8, 14380-14406.

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