Next Article in Journal
Volume and Mass Measurement of a Burning Wood Pellet by Image Processing
Previous Article in Journal
Investigating the Effect of Rainfall Parameters on the Self-Cleaning of Polluted Suspension Insulators: Insight from Southern China
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Energies 2017, 10(5), 602; doi:10.3390/en10050602

The Contribution of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Mitigation to Achieving Long-Term Temperature Goals

1
Grantham Institute, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2
Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
3
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, Laxenburg A-2361, Austria
4
Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
5
Met Office Hadley Centre, FitzRoy Road, Exeter, Devon EX1 3PB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vincenzo Dovì
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 11 April 2017 / Accepted: 14 April 2017 / Published: 1 May 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3211 KB, uploaded 1 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

This paper analyses the emissions and cost impacts of mitigation of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs) at a global level, in scenarios aimed at meeting a range of long-term temperature goals (LTTGs). The study combines an integrated assessment model (TIAM-Grantham) representing CO2 emissions (and their mitigation) from the fossil fuel combustion and industrial sectors, coupled with a model covering non-CO2 emissions (GAINS), using the latest global warming potentials from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report. We illustrate that in general non-CO2 mitigation measures are less costly than CO2 mitigation measures, with the majority of their abatement potential achievable at US2005$100/tCO2e or less throughout the 21st century (compared to a marginal CO2 mitigation cost which is already greater than this by 2030 in the most stringent mitigation scenario). As a result, the total cumulative discounted cost over the period 2010–2100 (at a 5% discount rate) of limiting global average temperature change to 2.5 °C by 2100 is $48 trillion (about 1.6% of cumulative discounted GDP over the period 2010–2100) if only CO2 from the fossil fuel and industrial sectors is targeted, whereas the cost falls to $17 trillion (0.6% of GDP) by including non-CO2 GHG mitigation in the portfolio of options—a cost reduction of about 65%. The criticality of non-CO2 mitigation recommends further research, given its relatively less well-explored nature when compared to CO2 mitigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs); climate change mitigation; long-term temperature goals (LTTGs) non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHGs); climate change mitigation; long-term temperature goals (LTTGs)
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gambhir, A.; Napp, T.; Hawkes, A.; Höglund-Isaksson, L.; Winiwarter, W.; Purohit, P.; Wagner, F.; Bernie, D.; Lowe, J. The Contribution of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Mitigation to Achieving Long-Term Temperature Goals. Energies 2017, 10, 602.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Energies EISSN 1996-1073 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top