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Energies 2017, 10(5), 601; doi:10.3390/en10050601

Investigating the Effect of Rainfall Parameters on the Self-Cleaning of Polluted Suspension Insulators: Insight from Southern China

1
State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044, China
2
State Grid Chongqing Electric Power Co. Electric Power Research Institute, Chongqing 401123, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: K.T. Chau
Received: 31 October 2016 / Revised: 21 April 2017 / Accepted: 21 April 2017 / Published: 1 May 2017
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Abstract

The cleaning effect of heavy rain (the rainfall reaches 5 mm every day) on surface contamination of insulators is more effective than dew, fog, mist, and other light rain conditions which can initiate leakage currents and increase the likelihood of flashover. It is well understood that heavy rain can wash away contamination from the surface of high voltage (HV) insulators and thereby reduce the risk of pollution flashover. This study examines the cleaning effect of natural wetting conditions on HV insulators on four 500 kV transmission lines in Hunan Province, China. Historical meteorological data, monthly equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD) and non-soluble deposit density (NSDD) measurements taken over a period of five years were analyzed to investigate the relationship between rainfall intensity and insulator cleaning. The measured data show that the ESDD/NSDD changes with the seasonal variation, which accumulates in dry season (January–April, about 117–122 days) and is washed off in the wet season (June–October, about 118–127 days). According to the measured data, the ESDD and NSDD on the surface of insulators were affected by the rainfall intensity (in the dry season it is about 1 mm/day and in the wet season it is about 5 mm/day). Based on a comparison of the four study sites, we propose a mathematical model to show the functional relationship between rainfall intensity and insulator self-cleaning capability. The mathematical model’s coefficient of determination (R2) is greater than 0.9 and the effective rate of self-cleaning capability reaches 80%. View Full-Text
Keywords: contamination; equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD); non-soluble deposit density (NSDD); rainfall intensity; insulator; functional relationship contamination; equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD); non-soluble deposit density (NSDD); rainfall intensity; insulator; functional relationship
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, Z.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Guo, Y.; Li, Y. Investigating the Effect of Rainfall Parameters on the Self-Cleaning of Polluted Suspension Insulators: Insight from Southern China. Energies 2017, 10, 601.

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