Next Article in Journal
An Integrated Approach for Estimating the Energy Efficiency of Seventeen Countries
Previous Article in Journal
Sensitivity Analysis to Control the Far-Wake Unsteadiness Behind Turbines
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Energies 2017, 10(10), 1594; doi:10.3390/en10101594

A Comparative Study on Damage Mechanism of Sandwich Structures with Different Core Materials under Lightning Strikes

1
State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206, China
2
School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China
3
Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ, UK
4
Sinoma Wind Power Blade Co., Ltd., Beijing 102100, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 August 2017 / Revised: 17 September 2017 / Accepted: 28 September 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4194 KB, uploaded 13 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Wind turbine blades are easily struck by lightning, a phenomenon that has attracted more and more attention in recent years. On this subject a large current experiment was conducted on three typical blade sandwich structures to simulate the natural lightning-induced arc effects. The resulting damage to different composite materials has been compared: polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) suffered pyrolysis and cracks inside, while the damage to balsa wood was fibers breaking off and large delamination between it and the resin layer, and only a little chemical pyrolysis. To analyze the damage mechanism on sandwich structures of different materials, a finite element method (FEM) model to calculate the temperature and pressure distribution was built, taking into consideration heat transfer and flow expansion due to impulse currents. According to the simulation results, PVC had the most severe temperature and pressure distribution, while PET and balsa wood were in the better condition after the experiments. The temperature distribution results explained clearly why balsa wood suffered much less chemical pyrolysis than PVC. Since balsa wood had better thermal stability than PET, the pyrolysis area of PET was obviously larger than that of balsa wood too. Increasing the volume fraction of solid components of porous materials can efficiently decrease the heat transfer velocity in porous materials. Permeability didn’t influence that much. The findings provide support for optimum material selection and design in blade manufacturing. View Full-Text
Keywords: wind turbine blade; lightning strikes; materials damage; finite element method (FEM); temperature distribution; airflow pressure wind turbine blade; lightning strikes; materials damage; finite element method (FEM); temperature distribution; airflow pressure
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Yan, J.; Wang, G.; Li, Q.; Zhang, L.; Yan, J.D.; Chen, C.; Fang, Z. A Comparative Study on Damage Mechanism of Sandwich Structures with Different Core Materials under Lightning Strikes. Energies 2017, 10, 1594.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Energies EISSN 1996-1073 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top