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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(6), 2505-2515; doi:10.3390/ijerph8062505
Article

Relationship between Medication Use and Cardiovascular Disease Health Outcomes in the Jackson Heart Study

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Received: 24 November 2010; in revised form: 13 January 2011 / Accepted: 13 January 2011 / Published: 23 June 2011
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Abstract: Even though some medications have the potential to slow the progress of atherosclerosis and development of CVD, there are many at-risk individuals who continue to resist the benefits that are available by not following the advice of medical professionals. Non-adherence to prescribed drug regimens is a pervasive medical problem that negatively affects treatment outcomes. Information from standardized interviews of 5301 African Americans participating in the Jackson Heart Study was examined to determine the association between demographic parameters, behavior including adherence to prescribed medical regimens, and health outcomes. Data were also collected at Annual Follow-Up and Surveillance visits. During the two weeks prior to the examination visit, almost 52% of the participants reported taking blood pressure medication, 14% took cholesterol medication, 16% took medication for diabetes, and 19% took blood thinning medication. Of those who did not take the prescribed medications, the reasons given were the following: 47% were in a hurry, too busy, or forgot to take medications; 23% were trying to do without medications; 18% had no money to purchase medications; 19% indicated that the medications made them feel bad; 17% felt that they could not carry out daily functions when taking medications. The African American population can benefit from heightened awareness of the risk factors that are associated with CVD and the benefits of following a prescribed treatment regimen. Unacceptable secondary effects of prescribed medication comprised an important cause of non-compliance. Encouragement of this population to communicate with their healthcare providers to ensure that medication regimens are better tolerated could increase compliance and improve health outcomes.
Keywords: medication use; minority; African-Americans; Jackson Heart Study; cardiovascular disease medication use; minority; African-Americans; Jackson Heart Study; cardiovascular disease
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Addison, C.C.; Jenkins, B.W.; Sarpong, D.; Wilson, G.; Champion, C.; Sims, J.; White, M.S. Relationship between Medication Use and Cardiovascular Disease Health Outcomes in the Jackson Heart Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8, 2505-2515.

AMA Style

Addison CC, Jenkins BW, Sarpong D, Wilson G, Champion C, Sims J, White MS. Relationship between Medication Use and Cardiovascular Disease Health Outcomes in the Jackson Heart Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2011; 8(6):2505-2515.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Addison, Clifton C.; Jenkins, Brenda W.; Sarpong, Daniel; Wilson, Gregory; Champion, Cora; Sims, Jeraline; White, Monique S. 2011. "Relationship between Medication Use and Cardiovascular Disease Health Outcomes in the Jackson Heart Study." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 8, no. 6: 2505-2515.



Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert