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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 939; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050939

Factors Associated with Immunization Opinion Leadership among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Los Angeles, California

1
Department of Social Welfare, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, 3255 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
UCLA Center for AIDS Research, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
Southern California HIV/AIDS Policy Research Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4
Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 1760 Haygood Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
6
Emory Center for AIDS Research, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 30 April 2018 / Accepted: 30 April 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
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Abstract

We sought to identify the characteristics of men who have sex with men (MSM) who are opinion leaders on immunization issues and to identify potential opportunities to leverage their influence for vaccine promotion within MSM communities. Using venue-based sampling, we recruited and enrolled MSM living in Los Angeles (N = 520) from December 2016 to February 2017 and evaluated characteristic differences in sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, and technology use among those classified as opinion leaders versus those who were not. We also asked respondents about their past receipt of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY) and meningococcal B (MenB) vaccines, as well as their opinions on the importance of 13 additional vaccines. Multivariable results revealed that non-Hispanic black (aOR = 2.64; 95% CI: 1.17–5.95) and other race/ethnicity (aOR = 2.98; 95% CI: 1.41–6.29) respondents, as well as those with a history of an STI other than HIV (aOR = 1.95; 95% CI: 1.10–3.48), were more likely to be opinion leaders. MenACWY (aOR = 1.92; 95% CI: 1.13–3.25) and MenB (aOR = 3.09; 95% CI: 1.77–5.41) vaccine uptake, and perceived importance for these and seven additional vaccines, were also associated with being an opinion leader. The results suggest that the co-promotion of vaccination and other health promotion initiatives via opinion leaders could be a useful strategy for increasing vaccination among MSM. View Full-Text
Keywords: opinion leadership; MSM; peer health navigation; vaccine measurement; immunization acceptance; immunization assessment; vaccine promotion opinion leadership; MSM; peer health navigation; vaccine measurement; immunization acceptance; immunization assessment; vaccine promotion
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Holloway, I.W.; Bednarczyk, R.; Fenimore, V.L.; Goldbeck, C.; Wu, E.; Himmelstein, R.; Tan, D.; Randall, L.; Lutz, C.S.; Frew, P.M. Factors Associated with Immunization Opinion Leadership among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Los Angeles, California. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 939.

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