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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020288

Smokers’ Views on Personal Carbon Monoxide Monitors, Associated Apps, and Their Use: An Interview and Think-Aloud Study

1
Research Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London WC1E 7HB, UK
2
Research Department of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, University College London, London WC1E 7HB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 February 2018 / Published: 7 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Evaluation of New Tobacco Control Interventions)
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Abstract

Smartphone-based personal carbon monoxide (CO) monitors and associated apps, or “CO Smartphone Systems” (CSSs) for short, could enable smokers to independently monitor their smoking and quitting. This study explored views and preferences regarding CSSs and their use among 16 adult, UK-based smokers. First, semi-structured interviews explored participants’ expectations of CSSs. Secondly, a think-aloud study identified participants’ reactions to a personal CO monitor and to existing or prototype apps. Framework Analysis identified five themes: (1) General views, needs, and motivation to use CSSs; (2) Views on the personal CO monitor; (3) Practicalities of CSS use; (4) Desired features in associated apps; and (5) Factors affecting preferences for CSSs and their use. Participants had high expectations of CSSs and their potential to increase motivation. Priority app features included: easy CO testing journeys, relevant and motivating feedback, and recording of contextual data. Appearance and usability of the personal CO monitor, and accuracy and relevance of CO testing were considered important for engagement. Participants differed in their motivation to use and preferences for CSSs features and use, which might have non-trivial impact on evaluation efforts. Personal CO monitors and associated apps may be attractive tools for smokers, but making CSSs easy to use and evaluating these among different groups of smokers may be challenging. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking cessation; mHealth and eHealth; intervention development; carbon monoxide; smartphone; qualitative study smoking cessation; mHealth and eHealth; intervention development; carbon monoxide; smartphone; qualitative study
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Herbeć, A.; Perski, O.; Shahab, L.; West, R. Smokers’ Views on Personal Carbon Monoxide Monitors, Associated Apps, and Their Use: An Interview and Think-Aloud Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 288.

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