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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020225

Exploring the Impacts of Housing Condition on Migrants’ Mental Health in Nanxiang, Shanghai: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

1
College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China
2
Healthy High Density Cities Lab, HKUrbanLab, The University of Hong Kong, Knowles Building, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China
3
Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 December 2017 / Revised: 6 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Environmental Exposures)
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Abstract

Although rapid urbanization and associated rural-to-urban migration has brought in enormous economic benefits in Chinese cities, one of the negative externalities include adverse effects upon the migrant workers’ mental health. The links between housing conditions and mental health are well-established in healthy city and community planning scholarship. Nonetheless, there has thusfar been no Chinese study deciphering the links between housing conditions and mental health accounting for macro-level community environments, and no study has previously examined the nature of the relationships in locals and migrants. To overcome this research gap, we hypothesized that housing conditions may have a direct and indirect effects upon mental which may be mediated by neighbourhood satisfaction. We tested this hypothesis with the help of a household survey of 368 adult participants in Nanxiang Town, Shanghai, employing a structural equation modeling approach. Our results point to the differential pathways via which housing conditions effect mental health in locals and migrants. For locals, housing conditions have direct effects on mental health, while as for migrants, housing conditions have indirect effects on mental health, mediated via neighborhood satisfaction. Our findings have significant policy implications on building an inclusive and harmonious society. Upstream-level community interventions in the form of sustainable planning and designing of migrant neighborhoods can promote sense of community, social capital and support, thereby improving mental health and overall mental capital of Chinese cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: housing condition; neighbourhood satisfaction; mental health; migrants; structural equation modelling (SEM); Shanghai housing condition; neighbourhood satisfaction; mental health; migrants; structural equation modelling (SEM); Shanghai
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Xiao, Y.; Miao, S.; Sarkar, C.; Geng, H.; Lu, Y. Exploring the Impacts of Housing Condition on Migrants’ Mental Health in Nanxiang, Shanghai: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 225.

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