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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 939; doi:10.3390/ijerph14080939

Taking a Stand: The Effects of Standing Desks on Task Performance and Engagement

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 1 July 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 21 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [315 KB, uploaded 21 August 2017]

Abstract

Time spent sitting is associated with negative health outcomes, motivating some individuals to adopt standing desk workstations. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of standing desk use on reading comprehension and creativity. In a counterbalanced, within-subjects design, 96 participants completed reading comprehension and creativity tasks while both sitting and standing. Participants self-reported their mood during the tasks and also responded to measures of expended effort and task difficulty. In addition, participants indicated whether they expected that they would perform better on work-relevant tasks while sitting or standing. Despite participants’ beliefs that they would perform worse on most tasks while standing, body position did not affect reading comprehension or creativity performance, nor did it affect perceptions of effort or difficulty. Mood was also unaffected by position, with a few exceptions: Participants exhibited greater task engagement (i.e., interest, enthusiasm, and alertness) and less comfort while standing rather than sitting. In sum, performance and psychological experience as related to task completion were nearly entirely uninfluenced by acute (~30-min) standing desk use. View Full-Text
Keywords: standing desk; sit-stand workstation; performance; reading comprehension; creativity; engagement standing desk; sit-stand workstation; performance; reading comprehension; creativity; engagement
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Finch, L.E.; Tomiyama, A.J.; Ward, A. Taking a Stand: The Effects of Standing Desks on Task Performance and Engagement. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 939.

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