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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070696

Nutrition Transition and Biocultural Determinants of Obesity among Cameroonian Migrants in Urban Cameroon and France

1
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte Internationale 3189, Environnement, Santé, Société, Faculté de Médecine-Nord, 51 bd Pierre Dramard, 13344 Marseille CEDEX 15, France
2
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7206, Eco-Anthropologie et Ethnobiologie, Musée de l’Homme, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 17 place du Trocadéro, 75016 Paris, France
3
MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 7 York Road, Parktown, Johannesburg 2193, South Africa
4
School of Health and Related Research, Public Health section, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Regent Court, 30 Regent Street, Sheffield S1 4DA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 27 January 2017 / Revised: 7 April 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 29 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1775 KB, uploaded 29 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

Native of rural West Cameroon, the Bamiléké population is traditionally predisposed to obesity. Bamiléké who migrated to urban areas additionally experience the nutrition transition. We investigated the biocultural determinants of obesity in Bamiléké who migrated to urban Cameroon (Yaoundé), or urban France (Paris). We conducted qualitative interviews (n = 36; 18 men) and a quantitative survey (n = 627; 266 men) of adults using two-stage sampling strategy, to determine the association of dietary intake, physical activity and body weight norms with obesity of Bamiléké populations in these three socio-ecological areas (rural Cameroon: n = 258; urban Cameroon: n = 319; urban France: n = 50). The Bamiléké valued overweight and traditional energy-dense diets in rural and urban Cameroon. Physical activity levels were lower, consumption of processed energy-dense food was frequent and obesity levels higher in new migrants living in urban Cameroon and France. Female sex, age, duration of residence in urban areas, lower physical activity and valorisation of overweight were independently associated with obesity status. This work argues in favour of local and global health policies that account for the origin and the migration trajectories to prevent obesity in migrants. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition transition; Cameroon; France; migrants; determinants; obesity nutrition transition; Cameroon; France; migrants; determinants; obesity
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Cohen, E.; Amougou, N.; Ponty, A.; Loinger-Beck, J.; Nkuintchua, T.; Monteillet, N.; Bernard, J.Y.; Saïd-Mohamed, R.; Holdsworth, M.; Pasquet, P. Nutrition Transition and Biocultural Determinants of Obesity among Cameroonian Migrants in Urban Cameroon and France. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 696.

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