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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 415; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040415

Lunch Salad Bars in New Orleans’ Middle and High Schools: Student Intake of Fruit and Vegetables

1
Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2
Department of Global Biostatistics and Informatics, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
3
Sisters of Charity Foundation of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH 44115, USA
4
Department of Health Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
5
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 3 March 2017 / Revised: 10 April 2017 / Accepted: 12 April 2017 / Published: 13 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Influences on Maternal and Child Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [403 KB, uploaded 13 April 2017]   |  

Abstract

The school lunch salad bar (SB) is a recommended food environmental strategy to increase access to, and consumption of fruit and vegetables (F/V). In a study to examine use of school lunch SBs, middle and high school students provided data via the Automated Self-Administered 24-h dietary recall (24HDR) tool for kids (ASA24-Kids-2012), a web-based data collection platform. Kilocalories were computed, food groups were assigned and F/V sources were obtained. Students (n = 718) from 12 schools with SBs and nine schools without SBs were approximately 87% African American, over 64% female and most were 7th and 8th graders. SB school students had higher median energy consumption at lunch but a higher percent of non-SB students reported eating fruit at lunch compared to SB students. Most students reporting eating F/V at lunch obtained F/V from the cafeteria main line; only 19.6% reported eating F/V exclusively from the SB. In SB schools median intake of cups F/V was higher among students using the SB (0.92) compared to those not using the SB (0.53). Results of this study are mixed, but encouraging. Additional factors, e.g., nutrition education, marketing, and kinds of foods offered on the SB need to be examined for potential influence on SB use. View Full-Text
Keywords: lunch salad bars; school environment; fruit and vegetable consumption; school lunch; adolescent; diet; school nutrition service lunch salad bars; school environment; fruit and vegetable consumption; school lunch; adolescent; diet; school nutrition service
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Johnson, C.C.; Myers, L.; Mundorf, A.R.; O’Malley, K.; Spruance, L.A.; Harris, D.M. Lunch Salad Bars in New Orleans’ Middle and High Schools: Student Intake of Fruit and Vegetables. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 415.

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