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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 378; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040378

Can Urbanization, Social and Spatial Disparities Help to Understand the Rise of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Bobo-Dioulasso? A Study in a Secondary City of Burkina Faso, West Africa

1
Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé, Direction Régionale de l’Ouest, 01 BP 545 Bobo Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso
2
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sorou Sanou, Université Polytechnique de Bobo-Dioulasso, 01 BP 676 Bobo-Dioulasso 01, Burkina Faso
3
LADYSS, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre la Défense, 92000 Nanterre, France
4
UMR Mivegec (UM-CNRS 5290-IRD 224), Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, 34394 Montpellier, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 31 October 2016 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Place and Health Equity)
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Abstract

Background: Unplanned urbanization plays a key role in chronic disease growth. This population-based cross-sectional study assessed the occurrence of cardiometabolic risk factors in Bobo-Dioulasso and their association with urbanization conditions. Methods: Through spatial sampling, four Bobo-Dioulasso sub-spaces were selected for a population survey to measure the adult health status. Yéguéré, Dogona, Tounouma and Secteur 25 had very different urbanization conditions (position within the city; time of creation and healthcare structure access). The sample size was estimated at 1000 households (250 for each sub-space) in which one adult (35 to 59-year-old) was randomly selected. Finally, 860 adults were surveyed. Anthropometric, socioeconomic and clinical data were collected. Arterial blood pressure was measured and blood samples were collected to assess glycemia. Results: Weight, body mass index and waist circumference (mean values) and serum glycemia (83.4 mg/dL ± 4.62 mmol/L) were significantly higher in Tounouma, Dogona, and Secteur 25 than in Yéguéré; the poorest and most rural-like sub-space (p = 0.001). Overall, 43.2%, 40.5%, 5.3% and 60.9% of participants had overweight, hypertension, hyperglycemia and one or more cardiometabolic risk markers, respectively. Conclusions: Bobo-Dioulasso is unprepared to face this public health issue and urgent responses are needed to reduce the health risks associated with unplanned urbanization. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic diseases; urbanization; health disparities; spatial sampling; medium-sized city; Bobo-Dioulasso chronic diseases; urbanization; health disparities; spatial sampling; medium-sized city; Bobo-Dioulasso
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Zeba, A.N.; Yaméogo, M.T.; Tougouma, S.J.-B.; Kassié, D.; Fournet, F. Can Urbanization, Social and Spatial Disparities Help to Understand the Rise of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Bobo-Dioulasso? A Study in a Secondary City of Burkina Faso, West Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 378.

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