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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 367; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040367

Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about the Prevention of Mosquito Bites and Zika Virus Disease in Pregnant Women in Greece

1
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Thessaly, Larissa 41222, Greece
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Thessaly, Larissa 41222, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anthony R. Mawson
Received: 23 January 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [287 KB, uploaded 31 March 2017]

Abstract

A survey among 573 pregnant women in Greece was conducted through self-completion of a questionnaire in July 2016. Traveling abroad the last six months was declared by 10.5% and 13.0% of pregnant women and their male sex partners, respectively, while 77.4% (441/570) had heard about Zika virus disease (ZVD). A lack of knowledge about sexual transmission of ZVD was identified in 63.3% of pregnant women, and 24.1% of responders did not know the risks to the fetus and baby. Approximately 73% of responders believed that the mosquito bites can affect their fetus and baby and 18% did not take measures to prevent mosquito bites routinely. Multivariable logistic regression models showed that traveling abroad the last six months by pregnant women correlated with correctly answering the question about the transmission of ZVD through bites of infected mosquitoes (Odds Ratio, OR = 10.47, 95% CI = 1.11–98.41). Traveling abroad with a male sex partner over the last six months correlated (OR = 2.05, 95% CI = 0.99–4.23) with responding correctly to the four key questions about the transmission of ZVD through mosquito bites, the risk of microcephaly, and the risks of traveling to the affected countries. A score of ≥5 for the nine responses given to questions of knowledge and attitudes was associated with a Bachelor of Science degree (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.09–2.18), antenatal care at a public hospital (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.28–3.98), being a civil servant as occupation (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.10–3.48), and having gotten information about ZVD from the public health sector (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.05–3.98). In conclusion, we found considerable knowledge gaps related to ZVD among Greek pregnant women. These study results are useful in targeting pregnant women for the prevention of potential Zika virus infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: vector-borne infections; viral infections; pregnancy; Zika virus; Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice (KAP) study; pregnant; repellent vector-borne infections; viral infections; pregnancy; Zika virus; Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice (KAP) study; pregnant; repellent
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mouchtouri, V.A.; Papagiannis, D.; Katsioulis, A.; Rachiotis, G.; Dafopoulos, K.; Hadjichristodoulou, C. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about the Prevention of Mosquito Bites and Zika Virus Disease in Pregnant Women in Greece. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 367.

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