Next Article in Journal
Characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine Use in Pediatric Dislocations, Sprains and Strains
Next Article in Special Issue
Neighborhood Factors and Fall-Related Injuries among Older Adults Seen by Emergency Medical Service Providers
Previous Article in Journal
Prevalence of Breastfeeding: Findings from the First Health Service Household Interview in Hunan Province, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Changes in Depressive Symptoms among Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions: Role of Positive and Negative Social Support
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 151; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020151

Older People’s Experiences of Mobility and Mood in an Urban Environment: A Mixed Methods Approach Using Electroencephalography (EEG) and Interviews

1
OPENspace, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH3 9DF, UK
2
The Stockholm Environment Institute, Environment Department, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marcia G. Ory and Matthew Lee Smith
Received: 13 December 2016 / Revised: 30 January 2017 / Accepted: 1 February 2017 / Published: 4 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging and Health Promotion)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2796 KB, uploaded 4 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

There are concerns about mental wellbeing in later life in older people as the global population becomes older and more urbanised. Mobility in the built environment has a role to play in improving quality of life and wellbeing, as it facilitates independence and social interaction. Recent studies using neuroimaging methods in environmental psychology research have shown that different types of urban environments may be associated with distinctive patterns of brain activity, suggesting that we interact differently with varying environments. This paper reports on research that explores older people’s responses to urban places and their mobility in and around the built environment. The project aim was to understand how older people experience different urban environments using a mixed methods approach including electroencephalography (EEG), self-reported measures, and interview results. We found that older participants experience changing levels of “excitement”, “engagement” and “frustration” (as interpreted by proprietary EEG software) whilst walking between a busy built urban environment and an urban green space environment. These changes were further reflected in the qualitative themes that emerged from transcribed interviews undertaken one week post-walk. There has been no research to date that has directly assessed neural responses to an urban environment combined with qualitative interview analysis. A synergy of methods offers a deeper understanding of the changing moods of older people across time whilst walking in city settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adults; mobility; mood; built environment; mixed methods; qualitative; electroencephalography (EEG) older adults; mobility; mood; built environment; mixed methods; qualitative; electroencephalography (EEG)
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tilley, S.; Neale, C.; Patuano, A.; Cinderby, S. Older People’s Experiences of Mobility and Mood in an Urban Environment: A Mixed Methods Approach Using Electroencephalography (EEG) and Interviews. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 151.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top