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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 132; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020132

Migration and Health in the Construction Industry: Culturally Centering Voices of Bangladeshi Workers in Singapore

Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation, Department of Communications & New Media, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117416, Singapore
Academic Editors: Albert P. C. Chan and Wen Yi
Received: 3 November 2016 / Revised: 6 January 2017 / Accepted: 24 January 2017 / Published: 29 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effecting a Safe and Healthy Environment in Construction)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [272 KB, uploaded 6 February 2017]

Abstract

Construction workers globally face disproportionate threats to health and wellbeing, constituted by the nature of the work they perform. The workplace fatalities and lost-time injuries experienced by construction workers are significantly greater than in other forms of work. This paper draws on the culture-centered approach (CCA) to dialogically articulate meanings of workplace risks and injuries, voiced by Bangladeshi migrant construction workers in Singapore. The narratives voiced by the participants suggest an ecological approach to workplace injuries in the construction industries, attending to food insecurity, lack of sleep, transportation, etc. as contextual features of work that shape the risks experienced at work. Moreover, participant voices point to the barriers in communication, lack of understanding, and experiences of incivility as features of work that constitute the ways in which they experience injury risks. The overarching discourses of productivity and efficiency constitute a broader climate of threats to worker safety and health. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace risks; injury; workplace safety; culture-centered approach; migration; health workplace risks; injury; workplace safety; culture-centered approach; migration; health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Dutta, M.J. Migration and Health in the Construction Industry: Culturally Centering Voices of Bangladeshi Workers in Singapore. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 132.

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