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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1197; doi:10.3390/ijerph14101197

Predicting Child Protective Services (CPS) Involvement among Low-Income U.S. Families with Young Children Receiving Nutritional Assistance

1
School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1350 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA
2
Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA
3
Department of Sociology and Criminology, The Pennsylvania State University, 505 Oswald Tower, University Park, PA 16802, USA
4
The Ohio State University College of Social Work, 1947 N College Rd, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 August 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 11 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Big Data to Advance Knowledge in Child Maltreatment)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [288 KB, uploaded 11 October 2017]

Abstract

This exploratory study examines combinations of income-tested welfare benefits and earnings, as they relate to the likelihood of child maltreatment investigations among low-income families with young children participating in a nutritional assistance program in one U.S. state (Wisconsin). Using a sample of 1065 parents who received the Special Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefits in late 2010 and early 2011, we find that relying on either work in the absence of other means-tested welfare benefits, or a combination of work and welfare benefits, reduces the likelihood of CPS involvement compared to parents who rely on welfare benefits in the absence of work. Additionally, we find that housing instability increases the risk of CPS involvement in this population. The findings from this investigation may be useful to programs serving low-income families with young children, as they attempt to identify safety net resources for their clientele. View Full-Text
Keywords: child protection; child maltreatment; safety net; poverty; welfare child protection; child maltreatment; safety net; poverty; welfare
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Slack, K.S.; Font, S.; Maguire-Jack, K.; Berger, L.M. Predicting Child Protective Services (CPS) Involvement among Low-Income U.S. Families with Young Children Receiving Nutritional Assistance. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1197.

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