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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180

Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy

Faculty of Education and Humanities, Department of Psychology, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda de los Alfares, 42, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
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Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 5 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
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Abstract

The present study examines the relationship between different roles in cyberbullying behaviors (cyberbullies, cybervictims, cyberbullies-victims, and uninvolved) and self-reported digital piracy. In a region of central Spain, 643 (49.3% females, 50.7% males) students (grades 7–10) completed a number of self-reported measures, including cyberbullying victimization and perpetration, self-reported digital piracy, ethical considerations of digital piracy, time spent on the Internet, and leisure activities related with digital content. The results of a series of hierarchical multiple regression models for the whole sample indicate that cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims are associated with more reports of digital piracy. Subsequent hierarchical multiple regression analyses, done separately for males and females, indicate that the relationship between cyberbullying and self-reported digital piracy is sustained only for males. The ANCOVA analysis show that, after controlling for gender, self-reported digital piracy and time spent on the Internet, cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims believe that digital piracy is a more ethically and morally acceptable behavior than victims and uninvolved adolescents believe. The results provide insight into the association between two deviant behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyberbullying; digital piracy; ethical behavior; adolescents; online violence cyberbullying; digital piracy; ethical behavior; adolescents; online violence
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Yubero, S.; Larrañaga, E.; Villora, B.; Navarro, R. Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1180.

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