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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1092; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101092

Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China

College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410081, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ling Tim Wong and Kwok Wai Mui
Received: 25 August 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 21 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Environmental Quality)
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Abstract

Existing thermal comfort field studies are mainly focused on the relationship between the indoor physical environment and the thermal comfort. In numerous chamber experiments, physiological parameters were adopted to assess thermal comfort, but the experiments’ conclusions may not represent a realistic thermal environment due to the highly controlled thermal environment and few occupants. This paper focuses on determining the relationships between upper extremity skin temperatures (i.e., finger, wrist, hand and forearm) and the indoor thermal comfort. Also, the applicability of predicting thermal comfort by using upper extremity skin temperatures was explored. Field studies were performed in office buildings equipped with split air-conditioning (SAC) located in the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW) climate zone of China during the summer of 2016. Psychological responses of occupants were recorded and physical and physiological factors were measured simultaneously. Standard effective temperature (SET*) was used to incorporate the effect of humidity and air velocity on thermal comfort. The results indicate that upper extremity skin temperatures are good indicators for predicting thermal sensation, and could be used to assess the thermal comfort in terms of physiological mechanism. In addition, the neutral temperature was 24.7 °C and the upper limit for 80% acceptability was 28.2 °C in SET*. View Full-Text
Keywords: thermal comfort; thermal sensation; thermal acceptability; thermal perception; upper extremity skin temperatures thermal comfort; thermal sensation; thermal acceptability; thermal perception; upper extremity skin temperatures
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Wu, Z.; Li, N.; Cui, H.; Peng, J.; Chen, H.; Liu, P. Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1092.

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