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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 78; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010078

Evaluation of Potential Average Daily Doses (ADDs) of PM2.5 for Homemakers Conducting Pan-Frying Inside Ordinary Homes under Four Ventilation Conditions

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Korea
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 19 September 2016 / Revised: 21 December 2016 / Accepted: 6 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
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Abstract

Several studies reported that commercial barbecue restaurants likely contribute to the indoor emission of particulate matters with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) while pan-frying meat. However, there is inadequate knowledge of exposure level to indoor PM2.5 in homes and the contribution of a typical indoor pan-frying event. We measured the indoor PM2.5 concentration and, using Monte-Carlo simulation, estimated potential average daily dose (ADD) of PM2.5 for homemakers pan-frying a piece of pork inside ordinary homes. Convenience-based sampling at 13 homes was conducted over four consecutive days in June 2013 (n = 52). Although we pan-fried 100 g pork for only 9 min, the median (interquartile range, IQR) value was 4.5 (2.2–5.6) mg/m3 for no ventilation and 0.5 (0.1–1.3) mg/m3 with an active stove hood ventilation system over a 2 h sampling interval. The probabilities that the ADDs from inhalation of indoor PM2.5 would be higher than the ADD from inhalation of PM2.5 on an outdoor roadside (4.6 μg/kg·day) were 99.44%, 97.51%, 93.64%, and 67.23%, depending on the ventilation conditions: (1) no window open; (2) one window open in the kitchen; (3) two windows open, one each in the kitchen and living room; and (4) operating a forced-air stove hood, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM2.5; average daily doses; indoor; ventilation; pan-frying PM2.5; average daily doses; indoor; ventilation; pan-frying
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Lee, S.; Yu, S.; Kim, S. Evaluation of Potential Average Daily Doses (ADDs) of PM2.5 for Homemakers Conducting Pan-Frying Inside Ordinary Homes under Four Ventilation Conditions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 78.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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