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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(6), 623; doi:10.3390/ijerph13060623

The Relationship between Attitudes toward Suicide and Family History of Suicide in Nagano Prefecture, Japan

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
2
Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
3
Nagano Prefecture Saku Health and Welfare Office, 65-1 Atobe, Saku, Nagano 385-8533, Japan
4
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 12 April 2016 / Revised: 16 June 2016 / Accepted: 17 June 2016 / Published: 22 June 2016
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Abstract

Certain attitudes toward suicide may be a risk factor for suicide among the bereaved. To explore this possibility, we examined the relationship between attitudes toward suicide and family history of suicide. We focused on two specific attitudes indicating resignation in a survey: #1 “When a person chooses to die by suicide, the suicide is inevitable” (i.e., inevitability belief); and #2 “A suicide cannot be stopped by any person, because suicide is unpreventable” (i.e., unpreventable belief). The data of 5117 fully completed questionnaires were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the two attitudes of resignation were significantly associated with a family history of suicide. The adjusted odds ratio for #1 was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.07–1.79) for individuals having experienced suicide by a family member or relative, while that for #2 was 1.57 (95% CI, 1.27–1.95) for experiencing a suicide by a family member or relative and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.05–1.49) for experiencing a suicide by a friend, business associate, partner or other. These two attitudes of resignation toward suicide were significantly associated with a family history of suicide. These attitudes might increase suicide risk among the bereaved. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicide; attitude toward suicide; family history of suicide; postvention suicide; attitude toward suicide; family history of suicide; postvention
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tsukahara, T.; Arai, H.; Kamijo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Washizuka, S.; Arito, H.; Nomiyama, T. The Relationship between Attitudes toward Suicide and Family History of Suicide in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 623.

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