Next Article in Journal
Assessment of the Casualty Risk of Multiple Meteorological Hazards in China
Previous Article in Journal
Pollution and Oral Bioaccessibility of Pb in Soils of Villages and Cities with a Long Habitation History
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(2), 223; doi:10.3390/ijerph13020223

Metabolic Syndrome and Serum Liver Enzymes in the General Chinese Population

Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 14 December 2015 / Revised: 2 February 2016 / Accepted: 4 February 2016 / Published: 17 February 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [910 KB, uploaded 17 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the general Chinese population. Methods: This study was a multicenter, cross-sectional study which was conducted in rural areas of China from the 2012 to 2013 Northeast China Rural Cardiovascular Health Study (NCRCHS), and 11,573 adults with complete data were included in our final analysis. Elevated ALT and AST levels were defined as >40 U/L. Serum ALT and AST levels within the reference range were divided into quartiles, and their associations with MetS were evaluated by logistic regressions. Results: A total of 7.4% and 3.5% participants had elevated serum ALT and AST levels, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was 37.3% in males and 45.8% in females. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found ALT level elevation, even within the reference range, was independently associated with MetS. The odds ratio (OR) values of MetS in the ALT quartiles 2–4 groups within the reference range were 1.113 (95% CI: 1.019–1.280), 1.375 (95% CI: 1.212–1.560), 1.878 (95% CI: 1.650–2.138) compared with the ALT quartile 1 group, and OR in the elevated ALT group was 3.020 (95% CI: 2.496–3.653). Positive relationship for MetS was also observed in elevated AST group (OR: 1.689, 95% CI: 1.314–2.171), but within the reference range, the AST level was not associated with MetS. Conclusions: Serum ALT level, even within the reference range, was significantly associated with MetS. However, only elevated AST levels above 40 U/L was positively associated with MetS. Within the reference range, we did not find a relationship between AST levels and MetS. View Full-Text
Keywords: alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; metabolic syndrome; liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; metabolic syndrome; liver enzymes
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, S.; Guo, X.; Yu, S.; Zhou, Y.; Li, Z.; Sun, Y. Metabolic Syndrome and Serum Liver Enzymes in the General Chinese Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 223.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top