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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(2), 175; doi:10.3390/ijerph13020175

Fatigue Risk Management: A Maritime Framework

Australian Maritime Safety Authority, 82 Northbourne Avenue, Braddon ACT 2612, Australia
Academic Editors: Greg Roach, Drew Dawson, Sally Ferguson, Paul Robers, Lynn Meuleners, Libby Brook and Charli Sargent
Received: 12 October 2015 / Revised: 11 November 2015 / Accepted: 18 November 2015 / Published: 29 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1205 KB, uploaded 29 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

It is evident that despite efforts directed at mitigating the risk of fatigue through the adoption of hours of work and rest regulations and development of codes and guidelines, fatigue still remains a concern in shipping. Lack of fatigue management has been identified as a contributory factor in a number of recent accidents. This is further substantiated through research reports with shortfalls highlighted in current fatigue management approaches. These approaches mainly focus on prescriptive hours of work and rest and include an individualistic approach to managing fatigue. The expectation is that seafarers are responsible to manage and tolerate fatigue as part of their working life at sea. This attitude is an accepted part of a seafarer’s role. Poor compliance is one manifest of this problem with shipboard demands making it hard for seafarers to follow hours of work and rest regulations, forcing them into this “poor compliance” trap. This makes current fatigue management approaches ineffective. This paper proposes a risk based approach and way forward for the implementation of a fatigue risk management framework for shipping, aiming to support the hours of work and rest requirements. This forms part of the work currently underway to review and update the International Maritime Organization, Guidelines on Fatigue. View Full-Text
Keywords: maritime; fatigue; work hours; rest hours; shipping; fatigue risk management, FRMS; safety management; safety assurance; maritime fatigue maritime; fatigue; work hours; rest hours; shipping; fatigue risk management, FRMS; safety management; safety assurance; maritime fatigue
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Grech, M.R. Fatigue Risk Management: A Maritime Framework. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 175.

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