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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1205; doi:10.3390/ijerph13121205

Parks and Green Areas Are Associated with Decreased Risk for Hyperlipidemia

1
School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799, Korea
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Harry H. X. Wang
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 10 November 2016 / Accepted: 21 November 2016 / Published: 3 December 2016
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Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the association between parks and green areas and hyperlipidemia in adults with groups stratified by moderate physical activity as a behavioral modification using the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey data and 212,584 participants enrolled in this study. The geographical codes of study participants were all matched on the basis of the amount of parks and green areas in each administrative district. Compared with participants living in the highest quartile of parks and green areas (Quartile 4), those living in the lowest quartile of green and park area (Quartile 1) were at an increased risk of physician-diagnosed hyperlipidemia and hyperlipidemia currently under treatment. Participants in the lowest quartile of parks and green areas were likely not to engage in any moderate physical activity. After classifying hyperlipidemia risk depending on the presence of moderate physical activity, those participating in moderate physical activity were less likely to have hyperlipidemia in all quartiles of parks and green areas than those not engaging in moderate physical activity. We found that parks and green areas were associated with decreased hyperlipidemia risk. Physical activity, which may benefit from the presence of parks and green areas, may reduce hyperlipidemia risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural environment; cardiovascular disease; physical activity; stress; lipid natural environment; cardiovascular disease; physical activity; stress; lipid
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.-J.; Min, J.-Y.; Kim, H.-J.; Min, K.-B. Parks and Green Areas Are Associated with Decreased Risk for Hyperlipidemia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1205.

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