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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1174; doi:10.3390/ijerph13121174

Research on the Relationship between Reaction Ability and Mental State for Online Assessment of Driving Fatigue

School of Transportation, Jilin University, No. 5988, Renmin Street, Nanguan District, Changchun 130022, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Suren Chen and Feng Chen
Received: 21 September 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 24 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety and Injury Prevention)
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Abstract

Background: Driving fatigue affects the reaction ability of a driver. The aim of this research is to analyze the relationship between driving fatigue, physiological signals and driver’s reaction time. Methods: Twenty subjects were tested during driving. Data pertaining to reaction time and physiological signals including electroencephalograph (EEG) were collected from twenty simulation experiments. Grey correlation analysis was used to select the input variable of the classification model. A support vector machine was used to divide the mental state into three levels. The penalty factor for the model was optimized using a genetic algorithm. Results: The results show that α/β has the greatest correlation to reaction time. The classification results show an accuracy of 86%, a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 85.53%. The average increase of reaction time is 16.72% from alert state to fatigued state. Females have a faster decrease in reaction ability than males as driving fatigue accumulates. Elderly drivers have longer reaction times than the young. Conclusions: A grey correlation analysis can be used to improve the classification accuracy of the support vector machine (SVM) model. This paper provides basic research that online detection of fatigue can be performed using only a simple device, which is more comfortable for users. View Full-Text
Keywords: traffic safety; mental fatigue; reaction time; physiological signals; gray correlation analysis; support vector machine; genetic algorithm traffic safety; mental fatigue; reaction time; physiological signals; gray correlation analysis; support vector machine; genetic algorithm
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MDPI and ACS Style

Guo, M.; Li, S.; Wang, L.; Chai, M.; Chen, F.; Wei, Y. Research on the Relationship between Reaction Ability and Mental State for Online Assessment of Driving Fatigue. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1174.

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