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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 39; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010039

A Pilot Study to Examine the Disparities in Water Quality between Predominantly Haitian Neighborhoods and Dominican Neighborhoods in Two Cities in the Dominican Republic

Center for Excellence on Health Disparities Research, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 17 August 2015 / Revised: 23 September 2015 / Accepted: 24 September 2015 / Published: 22 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [174 KB, uploaded 23 December 2015]

Abstract

Worldwide, diarrheal disease is a leading cause of death affecting over 1.7 million individuals annually. Much of this can be attributed to lack of clean water, sanitation and hygiene. Nearly all of these deaths occur in countries with developing economies. This public health problem is apparent in the island of Hispaniola; the island that is shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Significant gaps in income between the countries have resulted in Haitians migrating into the Dominican Republic. While there has been increased migration into the Dominican Republic, many of the neighborhoods remain segregated. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted at 49 sites in the Dominican Republic. Samples were classified as being from a Haitian neighborhood or Dominican neighborhood and analyzed for microbial contamination. Overall, Haitian neighborhoods were found to have statistically significantly higher levels of contamination of both coliform and E. coli. The odds of having E. coli contaminated water in Haitian neighborhoods are 4.25 times as high as Dominican neighborhoods. The odds of having coliform contaminated water in Haitian neighborhoods are 4.78 times as high as Dominican neighborhoods. This study provides evidence of the disparity in access to clean drinking water for Haitian immigrants and highlights the need for further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: health disparities; E. coli; water quality; waterborne disease; developing economies health disparities; E. coli; water quality; waterborne disease; developing economies
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rogers-Brown, J.; Johnson, R.; Smith, D.; Ramsey-White, K. A Pilot Study to Examine the Disparities in Water Quality between Predominantly Haitian Neighborhoods and Dominican Neighborhoods in Two Cities in the Dominican Republic. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 39.

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