Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Hot Spot Mutation in TP53 (R248Q) Causes Oncogenic Gain-of-Function Phenotypes in a Breast Cancer Cell Line Derived from an African American patient
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Characterizing the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States and China
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 28; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010028

Nutrition and Health Disparities: The Role of Dairy in Improving Minority Health Outcomes

Nutrition Consultant CBR Nutrition Enterprises, Massapequa 11758, NY, USA
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 15 August 2015 / Revised: 20 October 2015 / Accepted: 26 October 2015 / Published: 22 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [183 KB, uploaded 23 December 2015]

Abstract

Consuming a balanced diet, such as the food groups represented on MyPlate, is key to improving health disparities. Despite the best of intentions, however, the dietary guidelines can be culturally challenging, particularly when it comes to dairy consumption. Many African and Hispanic Americans avoid milk and dairy products—key contributors of three shortfall nutrients (calcium, potassium and vitamin D)—because many people in these populations believe they are lactose intolerant. However, avoiding dairy can have significant health effects. An emerging body of evidence suggests that yogurt and other dairy products may help support reduced risk of heart disease, hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes—conditions that disproportionately impact people of color. For this reason, the National Medical Association and the National Hispanic Medical Association issued a joint consensus statement recommending African Americans consume three to four servings of low-fat dairy every day. Cultured dairy products could play an important role in addressing these recommendations. Because of the presence of lactase-producing cultures, yogurt is often a more easily digestible alternative to milk, and thus more palatable to people who experience symptoms of lactose intolerance. This was a key factor cited in the final rule to include yogurt in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. View Full-Text
Keywords: health disparities; 2015 dietary guidelines; WIC; yogurt; National Medical Association; MyPlate; African American; Hispanic American; National Hispanic Medical Association health disparities; 2015 dietary guidelines; WIC; yogurt; National Medical Association; MyPlate; African American; Hispanic American; National Hispanic Medical Association
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Brown-Riggs, C. Nutrition and Health Disparities: The Role of Dairy in Improving Minority Health Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 28.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top