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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(9), 11178-11195; doi:10.3390/ijerph120911178

High Birth Weight Increases the Risk for Bone Tumor: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1
Department of Orthopedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
2
Department of Pediatrics, Wuhan Medical Care Center for Women and Children, Wuhan 430016, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul Tchounwou
Received: 31 July 2015 / Revised: 19 August 2015 / Accepted: 26 August 2015 / Published: 9 September 2015
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Abstract

There have been several epidemiologic studies on the relationship between high birth weight and the risk for bone tumor in the past decades. However, due to the rarity of bone tumors, the sample size of individual studies was generally too small for reliable conclusions. Therefore, we have performed a meta-analysis to pool all published data on electronic databases with the purpose to clarify the potential relationship. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 18 independent studies with more than 2796 cases were included. As a result, high birth weight was found to increase the risk for bone tumor with an Odds Ratio (OR) of 1.13, with the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) ranging from 1.01 to 1.27. The OR of bone tumor for an increase of 500 gram of birth weight was 1.01 (95% CI 1.00–1.02; p = 0.048 for linear trend). Interestingly, individuals with high birth weight had a greater risk for osteosarcoma (OR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.06–1.40, p = 0.006) than those with normal birth weight. In addition, in the subgroup analysis by geographical region, elevated risk was detected among Europeans (OR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.00–1.29, p = 0.049). The present meta-analysis supported a positive association between high birth weight and bone tumor risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: birth weight; bone tumor; osteosarcoma; Ewing sarcoma of bone; chondrosarcoma; meta-analysis birth weight; bone tumor; osteosarcoma; Ewing sarcoma of bone; chondrosarcoma; meta-analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, S.; Yang, L.; Pu, F.; Lin, H.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.; Shao, Z. High Birth Weight Increases the Risk for Bone Tumor: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 11178-11195.

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