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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(8), 8919-8932; doi:10.3390/ijerph120808919

Chronic Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields from Magnetic Resonance Imaging Devices Deserves Screening for Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Levels: A Rat Model

1
Orthopedics and Traumatology Department, Pamukkale University Medical Faculty, Denizli 20070, Turkey
2
Pathology Department, Servergazi State Hospital, Denizli 20100, Turkey
3
Histology and Embriology Department, Pamukkale University Medical Faculty, Denizli 20070, Turkey
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 6 June 2015 / Revised: 15 July 2015 / Accepted: 27 July 2015 / Published: 30 July 2015
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Abstract

Technicians often receive chronic magnetic exposures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices, mainly due to static magnetic fields (SMFs). Here, we ascertain the biological effects of chronic exposure to SMFs from MRI devices on the bone quality using rats exposed to SMFs in MRI examining rooms. Eighteen Wistar albino male rats were randomly assigned to SMF exposure (A), sham (B), and control (C) groups. Group A rats were positioned within 50 centimeters of the bore of the magnet of 1.5 T MRI machine during the nighttime for 8 weeks. We collected blood samples for biochemical analysis, and bone tissue samples for electron microscopic and histological analysis. The mean vitamin D level in Group A was lower than in the other groups (p = 0.002). The mean cortical thickness, the mean trabecular wall thickness, and number of trabeculae per 1 mm2 were significantly lower in Group A (p = 0.003). TUNEL assay revealed that apoptosis of osteocytes were significantly greater in Group A than the other groups (p = 0.005). The effect of SMFs in chronic exposure is related to movement within the magnetic field that induces low-frequency fields within the tissues. These fields can exceed the exposure limits necessary to deteriorate bone microstructure and vitamin D metabolism. View Full-Text
Keywords: Static magnetic field; magnetic resonance imaging; chronic exposure; vitamin D; osteoporosis; bone Static magnetic field; magnetic resonance imaging; chronic exposure; vitamin D; osteoporosis; bone
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gungor, H.R.; Akkaya, S.; Ok, N.; Yorukoglu, A.; Yorukoglu, C.; Kiter, E.; Oguz, E.O.; Keskin, N.; Mete, G.A. Chronic Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields from Magnetic Resonance Imaging Devices Deserves Screening for Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Levels: A Rat Model. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 8919-8932.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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