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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 6045-6065; doi:10.3390/ijerph120606045

The Effect of Engagement in Everyday Occupations, Role Overload and Social Support on Health and Life Satisfaction among Mothers

1
Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
2
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, T325 Koerner Pavilion, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 3 April 2015 / Revised: 13 May 2015 / Accepted: 22 May 2015 / Published: 28 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapies and Human Well-Being)
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Abstract

One of the founding assumptions underlying the health professions is the belief that there is a strong relationship between engagement in occupations, health, and wellbeing. The ability to perform everyday occupations (occupational performance) has a positive effect on health and wellbeing. However, there is also conflicting evidence indicating that participation in multiple roles or in certain occupations may lead to poorer health. Therefore, there is a need to better understand this relationship. The purpose of the present study was to examine three possible theoretical models to explain mothers’ health and life satisfaction from the perspective of their occupational performance, their role load, and their social support. 150 married mothers, ages of 25–45, who had at least one child between the ages of one to ten years, participated in the study. Data were collected by using seven self-report questionnaires. The models were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. The results show that social support has a direct effect on mothers’ physical health and life satisfaction and an indirect effect, mediated through the occupational performance variables, on mothers’ mental health and life satisfaction. Role overload does not affect mothers’ health and life satisfaction. These results suggest that mothers could benefit from health programs that help them manage their occupational routines. Such programs should focus on improving the mother’s occupational performance and adapting her social environment to fit her occupational needs. View Full-Text
Keywords: mothering; occupations; mental health; physical health; life satisfaction; Structural Equation Modeling mothering; occupations; mental health; physical health; life satisfaction; Structural Equation Modeling
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bar, M.A.; Jarus, T. The Effect of Engagement in Everyday Occupations, Role Overload and Social Support on Health and Life Satisfaction among Mothers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 6045-6065.

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