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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(3), 2718-2734; doi:10.3390/ijerph120302718

Understanding Socio-cultural Influences on Smoking among Older Greek-Australian Smokers Aged 50 and over: Facilitators or Barriers? A Qualitative Study

1
Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia
2
Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1414743777, Iran
3
Centre for Clinical Change and Health Care Research, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 8 December 2014 / Revised: 18 February 2015 / Accepted: 25 February 2015 / Published: 2 March 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [718 KB, uploaded 2 March 2015]

Abstract

Smokers of all ages can benefit by quitting, but many smokers continue to smoke. Older Greek-Australian smokers, one of the largest ethnic groups in Australia, have higher rates of smoking than other groups of older Australians. This qualitative study aimed to explore older Greek-Australians’ views about socio-cultural influences on their smoking. A snowball sampling technique was used to identify twenty Greek–Australian smokers (12 males and eight females), aged ≥ 50 years. They were recruited through the Greek Orthodox Community Center of South Australia (GOCSA). Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The audio-taped interviews were translated and transcribed, and then analysed using content analysis. Results suggested that smoking was considered as the “norm” by older Greek-Australian smokers. There were four groups embedded in the participants’ social networks that were reported to be important in relation to either encouraging smoking or, smoking abstinence. These support groups included: family members, friends, the Greek community, and physicians. Smokers’ family members (brothers) and friends were identified as facilitators of smoking whereas non-smoker family members (children and spouses) were reported as providing barriers to smoking. Different approaches were used by supporter groups to assist smokers to quit smoking—both planned and unplanned. Knowledge, planning of social and cultural supports, and addressing barriers to smoking cessation are a important part of health planning for older Greek-Australians. Social norms, including those arising from social interactions, and predisposing traits can influence smoking behaviour. Addressing the specific barriers to smoking cessation of older Greek-Australians is critical to addressing the risk for chronic disease in this group. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking cessation; Greek-Australians; older people; socio-cultural influences; facilitator; barriers smoking cessation; Greek-Australians; older people; socio-cultural influences; facilitator; barriers
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mohammadnezhad, M.; Tsourtos, G.; Wilson, C.; Ratcliffe, J.; Ward, P. Understanding Socio-cultural Influences on Smoking among Older Greek-Australian Smokers Aged 50 and over: Facilitators or Barriers? A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 2718-2734.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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