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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(2), 1612-1628; doi:10.3390/ijerph120201612

Annoyance, Sleep and Concentration Problems due to Combined Traffic Noise and the Benefit of Quiet Side

1
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden
2
Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Peter Lercher, Ronny Klaeboe and Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska
Received: 2 December 2014 / Accepted: 23 January 2015 / Published: 29 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Combined Health Effects of Environmental Exposures)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [754 KB, uploaded 29 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

Background: Access to a quiet side in one’s dwelling is thought to compensate for higher noise levels at the most exposed façade. It has also been indicated that noise from combined traffic sources causes more noise annoyance than equal average levels from either road traffic or railway noise separately. Methods: 2612 persons in Malmö, Sweden, answered to a residential environment survey including questions on outdoor environment, noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, sleep quality and concentration problems. Road traffic and railway noise was modeled using Geographic Information System. Results: Access to a quiet side, i.e., at least one window facing yard, water or green space, was associated with reduced risk of annoyance OR (95%CI) 0.47 (0.38–0.59), and concentration problems 0.76 (0.61–0.95). Bedroom window facing the same environment was associated to reduced risk of reporting of poor sleep quality 0.78 (0.64–1.00). Railway noise was associated with reduced risk of annoyance below 55 dB(A) but not at higher levels of exposure. Conclusions: Having a window facing a yard, water or green space was associated to a substantially reduced risk of noise annoyance and concentration problems. If this window was the bedroom window, sleeping problems were less likely. View Full-Text
Keywords: noise; road traffic; railway; annoyance; sleep; cognition; quiet side noise; road traffic; railway; annoyance; sleep; cognition; quiet side
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Bodin, T.; Björk, J.; Ardö, J.; Albin, M. Annoyance, Sleep and Concentration Problems due to Combined Traffic Noise and the Benefit of Quiet Side. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 1612-1628.

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