Next Article in Journal
The Spatial-Temporal Characteristics of Air Pollution in China from 2001–2014
Next Article in Special Issue
The Online Dissemination of Nature–Health Concepts: Lessons from Sentiment Analysis of Social Media Relating to “Nature-Deficit Disorder”
Previous Article in Journal
A Rapid Monitoring and Evaluation Method of Schistosomiasis Based on Spatial Information Technology
Previous Article in Special Issue
Green Space Attachment and Health: A Comparative Study in Two Urban Neighborhoods
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(12), 15860-15874; doi:10.3390/ijerph121215026

Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

1
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Vrije Universiteit (VU) University Medical Center, van der Boechorststraat 7, NL 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Psychology and Pedagogy, Vrije Universiteit (VU), Transitorium Van der Boechorststraat 1, NL 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit (VU), Transitorium Van der Boechorststraat 1, NL 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Landleven 1, 9747 AD Groningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 29 September 2015 / Revised: 7 December 2015 / Accepted: 9 December 2015 / Published: 14 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1320 KB, uploaded 14 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space. View Full-Text
Keywords: stress buffering; stress recovery; natural environment; autonomic nervous system; respiratory sinus arrhythmia; pre-ejection period stress buffering; stress recovery; natural environment; autonomic nervous system; respiratory sinus arrhythmia; pre-ejection period
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

van den Berg, M.M.; Maas, J.; Muller, R.; Braun, A.; Kaandorp, W.; van Lien, R.; van Poppel, M.N.; van Mechelen, W.; van den Berg, A.E. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 15860-15874.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top