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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(12), 15154-15161; doi:10.3390/ijerph121214977

Relationship Between Job Burnout and Neuroendocrine Indicators in Soldiers in the Xinjiang Arid Desert: A Cross-Sectional Study

1,†
,
2,†
,
1,†
,
1
and
1,*
1
Department of Public Health, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, China
2
Center for Disease Prevention and Control of Xinjiang Command, Urumqi 830001, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 6 August 2015 / Revised: 19 November 2015 / Accepted: 24 November 2015 / Published: 1 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [199 KB, uploaded 1 December 2015]

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between job burnout and neuroendocrine indicators in soldiers living in a harsh environment. Three hundred soldiers stationed in the arid desert and 600 in an urban area were recruited. They filled in the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. One hundred soldiers were randomly selected from each group to measure their levels of noradrenaline, serotonin, heat shock protein (HSP)-70, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and serum cortisol. Job burnout was more common in soldiers from urban areas than those from rural areas. Job burnout was significantly higher among soldiers stationed in the arid desert than those in urban areas. For soldiers in the arid desert, the levels of HSP-70, serum cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were significantly higher than in soldiers in urban areas. Correlation analyses showed that the degree of job burnout was weakly negatively correlated with the level of HSP-70. Being an only child, HSP-70 levels, cortisol levels, and ACTH levels were independently associated with job burnout in soldiers stationed in the arid desert. A higher level of job burnout in soldiers stationed in arid desert and a corresponding change in neuroendocrine indicators indicated a correlation between occupational stress and neurotransmitters. View Full-Text
Keywords: job burnout; harsh environment; soldiers; neuroendocrine indicator job burnout; harsh environment; soldiers; neuroendocrine indicator
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tao, N.; Zhang, J.; Song, Z.; Tang, J.; Liu, J. Relationship Between Job Burnout and Neuroendocrine Indicators in Soldiers in the Xinjiang Arid Desert: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 15154-15161.

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