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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(10), 12264-12276; doi:10.3390/ijerph121012264

Comparison of Hourly PM2.5 Observations Between Urban and Suburban Areas in Beijing, China

1,3,* , 1,3,* , 1,3
,
1,3
and
2
1
State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.11A, Datun Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101, China
2
College of History and Tourism Culture, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
3
Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing 210046, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 10 August 2015 / Revised: 15 September 2015 / Accepted: 24 September 2015 / Published: 29 September 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2200 KB, uploaded 29 September 2015]   |  

Abstract

Hourly PM2.5 observations collected at 12 stations over a 1-year period are used to identify variations between urban and suburban areas in Beijing. The data demonstrates a unique monthly variation form, as compared with other major cities. Urban areas suffer higher PM2.5 concentration (about 92 μg/m3) than suburban areas (about 77 μg/m3), and the average PM2.5 concentration in cold season (about 105 μg/m3) is higher than warm season (about 78 μg/m3). Hourly PM2.5 observations exhibit distinct seasonal, diurnal and day-of-week variations. The diurnal variation of PM2.5 is observed with higher concentration at night and lower value at daytime, and the cumulative growth of nighttime (22:00 p.m. in winter) PM2.5 concentration maybe due to the atmospheric stability. Moreover, annual average PM2.5 concentrations are about 18 μg/m3 higher on weekends than weekdays, consistent with driving restrictions on weekdays. Additionally, the nighttime peak in weekdays (21:00 p.m.) is one hour later than weekends (20:00 p.m.) which also shows the evidence of human activity. These observed facts indicate that the variations of PM2.5 concentration between urban and suburban areas in Beijing are influenced by complex meteorological factors and human activities. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM2.5 concentration; diurnal variations; spatial variations; day-of-week pattern; air quality PM2.5 concentration; diurnal variations; spatial variations; day-of-week pattern; air quality
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Yao, L.; Lu, N.; Yue, X.; Du, J.; Yang, C. Comparison of Hourly PM2.5 Observations Between Urban and Suburban Areas in Beijing, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 12264-12276.

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