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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(1), 735-745; doi:10.3390/ijerph120100735

The Effect of PM10 on Allergy Symptoms in Allergic Rhinitis Patients During Spring Season

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Gil Medical Center, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 405-760, Korea
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 406-799, Korea
3
Environmental Health Center for Allergic Rhinitis, Inha University Hospital, Ministry of Environment, Incheon 400-711, Korea
4
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon 400-711, Korea
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University College of Medicine Incheon 400-711, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 18 June 2014 / Accepted: 6 January 2015 / Published: 13 January 2015
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Abstract

Background: Asian sand dust (ASD) that originates in the Mongolian Desert in the spring induces serious respiratory health problems throughout East Asia (China, Korea, Japan). PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm) is a major air pollutant component in ASD. We studied the effects of PM10 on allergy symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis during the spring season, when ASD frequently develops. Methods: We investigated the changes in allergic symptoms in 108 allergic patients and 47 healthy subjects by comparing their 120-day symptom scores from February to May 2012. At the same time, the contributions of pollen count and PM10 concentration were also assessed. We also compared symptom scores before and 2 days after the daily PM10 concentration was >100 μg/m3. Results: The PM10 concentration during the 120 days was <150 μg/m3. No significant correlations were observed between changes in the PM10 concentration and allergic symptom scores (p > 0.05). However, allergic symptoms were significantly correlated with outdoor activity time (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results demonstrate that a PM10 concentration <150 μg/m3 did not influence allergy symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis during the 2012 ASD season. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; particulate matter; allergic rhinitis air pollution; particulate matter; allergic rhinitis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kang, I.G.; Ju, Y.H.; Jung, J.H.; Ko, K.P.; Oh, D.K.; Kim, J.H.; Lim, D.H.; Kim, Y.H.; Jang, T.Y.; Kim, S.T. The Effect of PM10 on Allergy Symptoms in Allergic Rhinitis Patients During Spring Season. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 735-745.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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