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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 9038-9049; doi:10.3390/ijerph110909038

Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota

Department of Pathology, Environmental Health and Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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Received: 17 June 2014 / Revised: 14 August 2014 / Accepted: 15 August 2014 / Published: 1 September 2014
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Abstract

The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. View Full-Text
Keywords: intestinal microbiota; inflammation; cancer; lymphoma; prevention intestinal microbiota; inflammation; cancer; lymphoma; prevention
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Yamamoto, M.L.; Schiestl, R.H. Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 9038-9049.

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