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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(8), 8443-8455; doi:10.3390/ijerph110808443

The Joint Influence of Gender and Amount of Smoking on Weight Gain One Year after Smoking Cessation

1
Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 44, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Lausanne, Route de la Corniche 10, CH-1010 Lausanne, Switzerland
3
Service of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University Hospital of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, CH-1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
4
Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 May 2014 / Revised: 4 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 18 August 2014
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Abstract

Weight gain is often associated with smoking cessation and may discourage smokers from quitting. This study estimated the weight gained one year after smoking cessation and examined the risk factors associated with weight gain in order to identify socio-demographic groups at higher risk of increased weight after quitting. We analyzed data from 750 adults in two randomized controlled studies that included smokers motivated to quit and found a gradient in weight gain according to the actual duration of abstinence during follow-up. Subjects who were abstinent for at least 40 weeks gained 4.6 kg (SD = 3.8) on average, compared to 1.2 kg (SD = 2.6) for those who were abstinent less than 20 weeks during the 1-year follow-up. Considering the duration of abstinence as an exposure variable, we found an age effect and a significant interaction between sex and the amount of smoking before quitting: younger subjects gained more weight than older subjects; among light smokers, men gained more weight on average than women one year after quitting, while the opposite was observed among heavy smokers. Young women smoking heavily at baseline had the highest risk of weight gain after quitting. View Full-Text
Keywords: weight gain; smoking cessation; overall duration of abstinence; weight gain risk factors; sex interaction weight gain; smoking cessation; overall duration of abstinence; weight gain risk factors; sex interaction
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Locatelli, I.; Collet, T.-H.; Clair, C.; Rodondi, N.; Cornuz, J. The Joint Influence of Gender and Amount of Smoking on Weight Gain One Year after Smoking Cessation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 8443-8455.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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