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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(7), 6653-6665; doi:10.3390/ijerph110706653
Article

Using Sit-Stand Workstations to Decrease Sedentary Time in Office Workers: A Randomized Crossover Trial

1
,
2
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3
,
2
 and
4,*
1 Division of Health Policy & Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA 2 Endocrine Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA 3 Family Medicine and Community Health, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA 4 Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 April 2014 / Revised: 29 May 2014 / Accepted: 10 June 2014 / Published: 25 June 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IJERPH: 10th Anniversary)
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Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether installation of sit-stand desks (SSDs) could lead to decreased sitting time during the workday among sedentary office workers. Methods: A randomized cross-over trial was conducted from January to April, 2012 at a business in Minneapolis. 28 (nine men, 26 full-time) sedentary office workers took part in a 4 week intervention period which included the use of SSDs to gradually replace 50% of sitting time with standing during the workday. Physical activity was the primary outcome. Mood, energy level, fatigue, appetite, dietary intake, and productivity were explored as secondary outcomes. Results: The intervention reduced sitting time at work by 21% (95% CI 18%–25%) and sedentary time by 4.8 min/work-hr (95% CI 4.1–5.4 min/work-hr). For a 40 h work-week, this translates into replacement of 8 h of sitting time with standing and sedentary time being reduced by 3.2 h. Activity level during non-work hours did not change. The intervention also increased overall sense of well-being, energy, decreased fatigue, had no impact on productivity, and reduced appetite and dietary intake. The workstations were popular with the participants. Conclusion: The SSD intervention was successful in increasing work-time activity level, without changing activity level during non-work hours.
Keywords: sedentary time; sit stand desk; work place intervention; accelerometer; dietary assessment sedentary time; sit stand desk; work place intervention; accelerometer; dietary assessment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Dutta, N.; Koepp, G.A.; Stovitz, S.D.; Levine, J.A.; Pereira, M.A. Using Sit-Stand Workstations to Decrease Sedentary Time in Office Workers: A Randomized Crossover Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 6653-6665.

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