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A comment was published on 2 July 2013, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2732-2734.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(4), 1356-1377; doi:10.3390/ijerph10041356
Article

Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

1,* , 2
,
1
 and
3
1 Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974, USA 2 Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand 3 Institute of Human Infections and Immunology, Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 January 2013 / Revised: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 12 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiation and Cancer Risk)
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Abstract

It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair).
Keywords: low-dose radiation; SCID mouse; bone marrow cells; genomic instability; chromosome aberrations low-dose radiation; SCID mouse; bone marrow cells; genomic instability; chromosome aberrations
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Rithidech, K.N.; Udomtanakunchai, C.; Honikel, L.; Whorton, E. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356-1377.

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