A comment was published on 2 July 2013, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2732-2734.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(4), 1356-1377; doi:10.3390/ijerph10041356
Article

Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

1 Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974, USA 2 Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand 3 Institute of Human Infections and Immunology, Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 January 2013; in revised form: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 12 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiation and Cancer Risk)
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Abstract: It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair).
Keywords: low-dose radiation; SCID mouse; bone marrow cells; genomic instability; chromosome aberrations

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rithidech, K.N.; Udomtanakunchai, C.; Honikel, L.; Whorton, E. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356-1377.

AMA Style

Rithidech KN, Udomtanakunchai C, Honikel L, Whorton E. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(4):1356-1377.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rithidech, Kanokporn N.; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert. 2013. "Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 4: 1356-1377.

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